RADIFIED
Guide to Norton Ghost

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Norton Ghost 2003

Continued from the introductory page:> Radified guide to Norton Ghost

New version: 26.august.2002 - Symantec releases Ghost 2003. This version offers a Windows-based interface. Prior to v2003, you needed to boot to DOS in order to create or restore an image. Being able to configure Ghost from Windows makes the program more user-friendly.

The official Symantec press release is posted here. PCWorld reviews Ghost 2003 here. They still claim it's "for PC pros only" tho. See here. In particular, notice where they say, "The program is saddled with a confusing manual, lousy Web support, and phone support that costs $30 per incident."

That's why this guide has become so popular. It teaches you everything you need to know .. with language that's easy to understand. That's because it was written by someone who knows how confusing Ghost can be.

continued from introductory page

With v2003, Ghost adds support for DVD burners. It also supports both USB 2.0 & Firewire drives (external drives). Best of all, Ghost now allows you to save/write images directly to NTFS partitions. See here.

This guide was designed for Ghost v2002, which is configured from DOS (the most reliable way to use Ghost). The concepts presented here still apply for v2003, which can also be configured from Windows, making the program easier to use. If you know how to use v2002 [DOS-based only], you'll know how to use v2003 [supports both Windows & DOS-based interfaces].

The main difference between v2003 and earlier versions is that now you don't need a Ghost boot floppy in order to CREATE the image. You only need the Ghost boot floppy to RESTORE an image .. if your system won't boot, that is .. which is usually why you restore an image (disaster recovery) .. or if your system drive dies.

As mentioned earlier, you can also write images directly to NTFS partitions. Previous versions of Ghost would only write images to FAT32 partitions. This is because Ghost works from DOS, and DOS does not support the NT file system [NTFS].

For this reason, users of Ghost [prior to v2003] used to keep at least one FAT32 partition on their system, in order to store/receive their images. With v2003, this is no longer necessary. Yet I still recommend you dedicate at least one FAT32 partition to store/receive your Ghost images, since FAT32 is *natively* supported by DOS, and Ghost works from DOS.

After you configure Ghost 2003 in Windows, it will automatically reboot ("drop down") to DOS for you, and create or restore your image. Symantec somehow designed Ghost so it can now write images to NTFS partitions from DOS [even tho DOS does not support the NT file system]. I have used Ghost 2003 with NTFS drives and it really works .. just like they said it would .. both writing images to, and restoring them from.

The Rad support board for Norton Ghost 2003 is here > Community Support for Ghost 2003.

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